New Music Weekly

New Music Weekly - September 9, 2014

Subscribe to the New Music Weekly playlist and you’ll get a hand-picked overview of the best songs of the week across genres every seven days. Right now, if you can picture it, we’re throwing our hands in the air to the latest EDM anthem by Calvin Harris featuring John Newman, inhaling sweet drama from Seattle’s Perfume Genius, two-steppin’ to a flirty number from country singer Dustin Lynch and getting our dance on to the urban duo known as Plan B. Read on as you listen for more highlights of the week in the Playlist Notes.

There’s a lot more to discover this week, too. Click over to the Rdio New Releases pages to see and hear everything new.

PLAYLIST NOTES

  • BANKS - Goddess
    From the dark electronics of “Beggin for Thread” to stripped-down ballad “Someone New,” Los Angeles singer-songwriter Jillian Banks explores R&B and pop with wry lyrics and an edge on her debut album.

  • Jhené Aiko - Souled Out (Deluxe)
    The third album from the free-spirited and street smart R&B singer from Los Angeles features a pair of Chicago prodigies: Kanye West producer No I.D. and rapper Common.

  • Death From Above 1979 - The Physical World (Standard)
    The Canadian dance punk act’s sophomore album is the first in 10 years (and the first since reforming in 2011 following a 2006 breakup).

  • Interpol - El Pintor
    The New York rockers go back to their basic roots on their fifth album, which features appearances by members of Secret Machines and Bon Iver.

  • Lee Brice - I Don’t Dance (Deluxe Version)
    The Nashville songwriter behind singles for Tim McGraw and Garth Brooks shows his own tender side on his third album.

  • Ryan Adams - Ryan Adams
    The 39-year-old singer-songwriter is unbelievably on his 14th studio album, this one a slightly more orchestral affair recorded at the home studio he compares to the Millennium Falcon.

  • Vance Joy - Dream Your Life Away
    The Aussie singer-songwriter behind the catchy breakthrough international hit “Riptide” explores different sounds while retaining the semi-acoustic feel on his debut album.

∞  September 9, 2014 — 7:22AM

Posted by Rdio at 7:22AM in New Music Weekly |

ExclusivesRdio Sessions

Exclusive: Tokyo Police Club’s Arresting Rdio Sessions

Tokyo Shoot  Carlton 2 (2 of 2)
Indie rockers Tokyo Police Club returned to the world earlier this year with an album of bright and fun songs with polished pop leanings that hit the top 20 in their native Canada. Recorded live at South By Southwest in Austin earlier this year, the band’s contribution to our Rdio Sessions series features some of the most memorable offerings from Forcefield, their most recent and favorite album.

Want more Rdio Sessions? Play our Rdio Sessions station to hear more exclusive live recordings from Rdio favorites like Cayucas, Lucius and STRFKR.

∞  September 5, 2014 — 9:47AM

Posted by Rdio at 9:47AM in Exclusives, Rdio Sessions |

News

The Renaissance of Music Collecting

By Marc Ruxin

I was six when I first fell for music. I raided my parent’s record collection, skipped the classical records, didn’t quite understand jazz or blues, but fell hard for The Beatles. Although it was the music that made me smile, it was also the act of pulling the record from the sleeve, admiring the art, reading the song titles, cleaning the vinyl, and dropping the needle on the record that was very much part of the fun.

As it turned out, this was not a passing phase. I’d listen to the radio to fall asleep. It was the mid-70’s so the commercial music on the radio was what we now describe as classic rock, with a heavy dose of disco. By the time I was 12, I would begin to spend my hard earned allowance on records. Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Tom Petty, Styx, Foreigner, Wings, Billy Squire, The Police, The Who, Ozzy Osborne - it was pretty obvious stuff I suppose, even though some of it didn’t endure the test of time. In the 7th grade, a buddy with cool older brothers, played me a cassette called “This Are Two Tone.” My mind was blown initially by the stark black and white mod cover art, but then I listened to the music. It was on that tape that I discovered The Specials, The Selector, Madness and finally The English Beat. My life was changed by rock and roll. The next day I raided my piggy bank and bought all the records I could find by the artists on the compilation.

I was hooked. I begged my parents to get me a subscription to Rolling Stone, and then Spin, and a few years later Option Magazine. I clipped out album reviews, band photos, and hung them on the cork wall in my bedroom next to the posters that came from the various albums: Devo, Wings, Rush. The first thing I did when I turned 16 and got my drivers license was drive to Cleveland to buy records. For the next 20 years I frittered away most of my allowance or paychecks, and much of my free time, milling through bins of records and CDs building a massive collection of life-changing music.

But at some point in the early 2000’s I started buying digital albums, primarily from eMusic and then eventually from Amazon or directly from artist sites. I never liked the DRM on iTunes, and so I steered clear of Apple as a music store. I stopped going to Amoeba Music music every weekend, Kim’s Video in NYC closed, and slowly but surely a huge part of my lifelong obsession collecting physical music ended. Option Magazine was long gone, Rolling Stone had become a magazine about politics and celebrity photos, and Spin had long lost its focus. I now bought external hard-drives and spent an ungodly amount of time digitizing CDs, scrubbing the messy metadata and multiple copies of albums digitized at various bit rates. Then Napster happened, and the music business was turned on its head. It became easier to steal music than to buy it. I never bought into file sharing, because after all if artists couldn’t make a living making music, there wouldn’t be as many artists trying to make music. I was trying to do my part in a very small way, so I continued as a small patron buying tracks and albums.

There were no more beautiful double albums, liner notes, and song lyrics. There was no more flipping of albums, browsing through walls of CDs in search of the perfect album. It was more about accumulating digital bits on increasingly small and slick drives. But then came the iPod. The Walkman and headphone culture had been largely dead for eons, but these digital files could now be consumed on these small sleek devices. Tiny white headphones became a fashion accessory, and collecting music started to get interesting again.

But then something amazing happened. Online music services started to emerge. There was Pandora, Rhapsody, Mog, iMeem and eventually Spotify, Soundcloud and Rdio. Initially they were web services because mobile devices weren’t sophisticated enough to handle the software, and there wasn’t enough storage to take advantage of the promise of “renting” infinite amounts of music. Broadband signals were weak so streaming was often challenging. But then came the iPhone and the app store, and the companies that survived built apps, and the labels started to allow for the legal streaming of music to phones and computers. Companies like Sonos made it easy to stream files from central archives, and eventually blue tooth devices like the Jambox made it easy to push music over Bluetooth to compact devices.

The magazines of old were replaced by wonderful blogs like Pitchfork, Brooklyn Vegan, Aquarium Drunkard, and Hipster Runoff. Artists could now release singles, covers and EPs immediately, and ride the hype cycle into instant stardom. Distribution was becoming increasingly influenced by artists, and these new platforms made being a music collector so much more immediate, accessible and inexpensive.

In the old days, you needed to be rich, or content being poor to be a great collector. Albums, CDs and cassettes were expensive relative to today’s $10 a month subscription service. For less than the cost of one downloaded album on iTunes or Amazon, you can have over 30M tracks available online or offline, on the web or your phone, played through a stereo, or computer or tablet. Instead of having to commit to buying something on a whim that might suck, you can easily test drive a song or an album at no additional cost. Had this option been available to me as a teenager, I would have saved literally thousands of dollars a year. Instead of buying magazine subscriptions, I can read reviews, watch live concerts and videos for free.

Discovery is also considerably easier. You now have social features that prompt you when there are new releases and highlights popular music across your social graph accessible in a single click. After all people turn people onto music and that will never change. Things like bios, photos, and social media are integrated into these services, reducing the endless trolling for the right reviews, or buried diamonds in the new release rough. Now you can have most of the music ever recorded complete with all the context (reviews, ratings, etc.) delivered over the Internet to whatever device you happen to be on.

The act of collecting has become more about consuming and connecting. The times they are a changin’.

At Rdio we have built what I would argue is the most comprehensive service available to give music lovers music any way they want it. Songs, albums, playlists and starting today radio stations built around you. From algorithmically generated stations that can be initiated with a song or artist, to fully curated stations based on mood or genre, to personal stations where people can listen to other people’s recent activity. You can now access all of this for free supported by ads or uninterrupted for a fraction of the cost of a single CD.

The future is now. Artists can reach a global audience instead of the one restricted by physical distribution and retail marketing. This is a good thing. The more listeners an artist can attract directly, the more money they can make. The more money they can make, the more artists will continue to pursue creating art.

In the end surely something was lost when the act of physical collecting disappeared. The era of “High Fidelity” is largely over. The Jack Blacks who man the counters of dusty record stores are gone. The smell of new vinyl is restricted to purists, and the hand printed zines of old are all but extinct. The walls of records and CD’s have disappeared from apartments and houses, but now these private collections can be shared with the world in pint-sized digital images.

Collecting music is now a democratic, global endeavor. You don’t have to live in hip cities to access limited edition music. You don’t have to be rich to afford the pursuit. Nearly everything is available to anyone with a smartphone or computer. Music is, after all, one of the world’s most creative inventions. It is highly local, yet massively global. After years of trying to build a model where both consumers and artists win, we are finally at the beginning of something amazing. Technology has caught up, and the business of music has finally entered a safe and exciting time.

I couldn’t be more proud to be part of a company that built a business specifically to bring music to everybody, wherever they are and no matter what music they like. In the immortal words of Bob Marley “where there is a will, there is always a way.” It has been a long journey, but today the song doesn’t remain the same, but then again it does … only differently.

Marc Ruxin is the COO of Rdio.

∞  September 4, 2014 — 4:43PM

Posted by Rdio at 4:43PM in News |

News

Music Sounds Better With You

Tastemakerstations_360 (1).

By Joe Armenia

Rdio has always focused on giving music fans the best access to the artists they love while also coming up with new ways for them to discover their next new favorites. The promise of discovery through people has always been paramount at Rdio, and we get really excited when we get to facilitate the process. Creating platforms and programs that showcase not only the superstar artist releases but also the most obscure albums from artists we think need to be heard is a privilege, and we take it seriously.

Today, we advance that promise with another great leap with the introduction of our free stations-first offering, creating even more exciting opportunities for you to connect with tastemakers and artists who feel exactly the same way about connecting people and music.

As a diehard music fan, it’s always fascinating to know what music my favorite artists or personalities are listening to. Now, you can turn to some of the influencers and tastemakers you trust most to serve up some new music. Stations from our friends at NPR Music, Rolling Stone and Paste Magazine will give you a good earful of what they’ve got in rotation for their audiences. If you’re a chart lover, check out Billboard’s station featuring the top songs of the week. You can even follow musical trends as they are made through discovery hubs like Shazam and Hype Machine. The listening possibilities are endless, with stations curated by everyone from the iconic GRAMMY® Awards to Aussie electro legends The Presets to – just in time for Fashion Week - the always fashionable Marc Jacobs International and tons more. Look for the Tastemakers section on the Browse tab and dive in.

What’s insanely exciting about these stations is that it’s really just the beginning. We have the opportunity to create hosted Rdio stations, so your connection to your favorite artist or celebrity can be much more personal. Watch this space next week for news on our first-ever hosted station.

And the announcements aren’t over yet. To celebrate all the great new Rdio features, we’re rolling out a slew of Rdio Sessions over the next few weeks. Continuing the ongoing series of unique, intimate recorded performances hand-picked by and exclusive to Rdio, we’re introducing 2 new sets today: hot country duo Dan + Shay (our first country Session!) and Canadian rockers Tokyo Police Club.

These sets will be joined in the coming weeks by Rdio Sessions from an amazing lineup of artists: The 1975, Daughtry, Switchfoot, SOHN, Haerts, Strange Talk, Jon Pardi, Little Boots and Tensnake, our first original DJ session. Can’t get enough of these amazing, intimate recordings? Tune into the Rdio Sessions station (you knew I was going to say that) to catch up on all of the great music in the Rdio Sessions vaults.

Joe Armenia runs Rdio’s music team and influencer programs. Follow Joe on Rdio.

∞  September 4, 2014 — 3:26PM

Posted by Rdio at 3:26PM in News |

News

Come As You Are: An Evolved Rdio for Every Kind of Listener

Help-home
By Chris Becherer

A great music service should let you listen any way you want. Sometimes, like when you’re driving or hosting friends, that means “turning on the radio” and letting the service do the work. Other times, you want complete control of what you’re hearing, such as when a new album drops from your favorite band or when a friend shares a song with you that you need to hear, right now.

No streaming music service has successfully combined these listening experiences. Music fans have been forced to go to different services for “lean-back listening” (radio stations) and “on-demand listening” (albums, songs, and playlists). This is an unnecessary hassle, and it cheats you out of having one service really get to know your music taste.

Today, we’re rolling out a significant update on iOS, Android, web, and Roku that for the first time pairs a first-class stations experience with a first-class on-demand experience — along with a suite of new features that seamlessly integrates the two and personalizes the entire service around you. It’s an evolved Rdio, tuned to you and your unique way of loving music, and we’re thrilled to finally share it with you.

Free radio, front and center

Last year, we added the Stations section to Rdio, along with the ability to start a wide variety of endless stations based on artists, songs, albums, playlists, genres — even record labels. We also introduced You FM, a station that takes into account everything we know about you — what you’ve listened to, what you’ve told us you liked, even what you Like on Facebook — to create a truly personalized listening experience. You can listen to your own You FM, or tune into the You FM station of a friend or tastemaker like Rolling Stone magazine or The El Rey Theatre. You FM quickly became one of our most popular features.

Today, we are doubling down on lean-back listening and moving stations to the forefront of the Rdio experience. After downloading the app and signing up in a few simple steps, new users will immediately start listening to a free radio station based on their favorite artist, with no trials to start or paywalls to navigate. From there, they will have access to all the various station types we offer, each drawing on the 30 million tracks in our catalog. They will also be able to enjoy hundreds of brand new curated stations, handcrafted by our in-house team of experts to fit any mood or activity.

That’s just the start. We’ve re-examined all of Rdio through a stations-first lens. Rather than a single dedicated section, stations now live throughout the app. Whether in Recommendations, Trending (our new section combining Heavy Rotation and Top Charts), or Browse (our new home for expert-curated stations), new users will be looking primarily at stations.

All of this is completely free to users today in 20 countries around the world with plans to roll out to more of Rdio's 60 supported countries in the coming months.

We believe Rdio is now the best free radio experience on the market. But what about Rdio Unlimited subscribers, our most loyal fans? Rdio Unlimited pairs all of these great stations with the ability to play albums, songs and playlists on-demand and offline. One of the central design goals of this update was to maintain a single app with a consistent user experience that scales gracefully across our subscription tiers. Every one of the new features we are introducing today was carefully designed to be flexible enough to benefit all of our listeners, free or paid. The best example of this flexible approach is Home, our new landing page on web and mobile.

Your new Home on Rdio

Home is the feature we are the most excited for you to try out. It’s based on ideas that Head of Design Ryan Sims and a group of designers, engineers, and product managers here have been thinking deeply about for several years. Rdio was founded on the idea of social music discovery — that the best music recommendations come from people you know and tastemakers you trust. Home is the next step in the evolution of that idea. As one beta user told us, “It’s what Rdio always wanted to be.”

Home is an evolving feed of personalized music stories that surfaces the best of Rdio in a single destination. Stories can be based on your own activity, such as “Keep Listening” — where you can quickly get back to music you’ve recently played — and “Similar to…” — which gives recommendations based on your favorite artists. Stories can be based on your friends’ recent activity, or recommendations from our in-house team of music experts, such as “Artist to Watch” — which highlights new and emerging talent on a weekly basis. As you keep using Rdio, the stories you see will become more varied and personalized. There are over 20 different kinds of stories in Home, and we’ll be adding new ones all the time.

One of my favorite stories is “Dig deeper with more by…”. It looks for albums that you haven’t yet played from familiar artists, surfacing deep cuts from our vast catalog of 30 million songs — remixes, b-sides, reisssues, etc. This morning, I discovered three gems from one of my favorite bands, The Flaming Lips, that I hadn’t ever heard — one live album, one soundtrack, and one single with a bunch of amazing b-sides that I never would have found on my own with just a search box.

Home also gives us a vehicle to highlight user-generated contributions to Rdio, like comments and playlists, in a way we couldn’t before. I follow some hardcore music nerds, many of them Rdio employees, and if one of them leaves a gushing comment about a new record, I’ll probably want to give it a listen — as long as I see the comment. Now, that comment will make its way to me right in Home, the most precious real estate in Rdio. Simply put, Home encourages conversation around the music you love.

Home borrows some of the personalization concepts of You FM and applies them to not just one station, but the entire user experience. As you grow with the service, playing more music and following other listeners, Home will evolve and tailor all of Rdio to you based on how you like to listen. The word we keep using to describe it is “elastic” — whether you are a free stations listener, a hardcore collector of albums, or a playlist creator, Home will stretch and bend toward your tastes, suggesting music you’ll like and have the access to play.

More new ways to organize and discover

Home is just one of many cool new features launching today. Favorites is an expanded, smarter version of your collection — you can now collect any artist, album, song, station, or playlist by tapping the heart icon to favorite it. The more you favorite, the more Rdio gets to know you, surfacing music relevant to you in Home and You FM. With Trending, we’ve improved Heavy Rotation by combining it with Top Charts so that you can quickly see the music that's popular with your friends or the entire Rdio community. Check out our new curated stations, handcrafted by our in-house experts and organized around a variety of moods and activities, in Browse. Continuing our long tradition of social discovery features, we’ve created a new section on the web called People that lets you see what your friends are listening to, right now.

All of these features are available to everyone, whether you’re listening to stations for free or you’re an Rdio Unlimited subscriber. Give them a try, or learn more about how they work.

Built by fans, for fans

With this update — which includes more new features rolled out at any one time since the original launch of the service in 2010 — we’ve put Rdio in a position to be the daily music destination for a wide variety of listeners. Rdio now pairs a first-class, cross-platform, global, free experience with the best on-demand experience on the market.

Every day, the team here at Rdio focuses on building the very best music service possible. Not the best music service for the industry — but for you, the fan. Because we’re music fans, too. We get to work on a product that we ourselves passionately use every day, that we obsess over. Everyone here has strong opinions about Rdio. This creates heated arguments about the product, its features — even its pixels. It’s never easy, but this kind of passion ultimately leads to a better product. I want to thank every single person at Rdio for channeling all of that passion and hard work into this release. It’s our best yet.

We’ve been looking forward to this day for a long time. We invite you to try out the latest evolution of Rdio, and we very sincerely hope that you love it as much as we do.

Jason Russell, playlist junkie and lead product manager for Home, assembled this for the occasion. Enjoy.

Chris Becherer is Rdio's SVP of Product. Follow him at rdio.com/people/becherer

∞  September 4, 2014 — 10:01AM

Posted by Rdio at 10:01AM in News |

ExclusivesRdio Sessions

Exclusive: Dan + Shay Take on Tom Petty in Rdio Sessions

D+S_0161V2(retouch) (1)
Rising Nashville stars Dan Smyers and Shay Mooney, better known as Dan + Shay, have graced us with the first country edition of Rdio Sessions, our intimate live series performed for listeners like you. The set, recorded in Nashville, features songs from their debut album Where It All Began, including the singles “19 You + Me” and “Show You Off,” and a soulful cover version of Tom Petty’s 1989 hit “Free Fallin’.”

If you’ve yet to be acquainted with these two charmers, you’ll instantly hear why their youthful songs about love and fun have been a welcome wave in country and their songwriting skills have already been utilized by big acts like Rascal Flatts. Play our Rdio Sessions Station to hear more highlights from this one-of-a-kind performance series.

∞  September 4, 2014 — 10:00AM

Posted by Rdio at 10:00AM in Exclusives, Rdio Sessions |

New Music Weekly

New Music Weekly - September 2, 2014

The latest New Music Weekly playlist will turn you on to artists like art punk act Half Japanese, a capella wonders Pentatonix and soul and jazz musician Diggs Duke. Mostly though, this will be remembered as the week that blessed us with not one but two releases from Prince. Thank you, Purple One! Plus don’t miss the long-awaited seventh album from Counting Crows. Read on for more info about that and other highlights of the playlist, and don’t forget to subscribe so you’ll always have the latest one waiting for you. You can also visit the Rdio New Releases page when you’re ready to venture out on your own.

PLAYLIST NOTES

  • Sleater-Kinney - Sleater-Kinney (Remastered)
    A slew of newly remastered classic albums from the seminal female punk trio that was fronted by Portlandia star Carrie Brownstein begins with the vital 1995 debut.

  • Sinkane - Mean Love
    The London artist with roots in Sudan crafts a genre-blurring album of soulful Afrobeat, reggae and electronic pop.

  • Maroon 5 - V (Deluxe)
    The fifth album from the LA pop rock gods features more big hooks from frontman Adam Levine and a collaboration with Gwen Stefan written by Sia, plus three bonus tracks on the deluxe edition.

  • Prince - U KNOW and Prince & 3RDEYEGIRL - WHITECAPS
    The artist formerly known as The Artist is famously prolific, but he still took fans by surprise when he announced he’d return to his old label to drop a solo release and a funk rock collaboration with his touring band 3RDEYEGIRL at the very same time.

  • Haerts - Giving Up
    Another long-awaited EP from the Brooklyn indie pop act poises singer Nini Fabi and crew for more widescreen exposure.

  • Homeboy Sandman - Hallways
    The New York rapper’s second album for Stones Throw Records features production by DJ Spinna and Oh No and explores the fluctuating space between where you are and where you’re going.

  • TV on the Radio - Happy Idiot
    The boldly tripped-out single from the groundbreaking Brooklyn art rock act is the first release since the death of bassist Gerard Smith in 2011.

∞  September 2, 2014 — 9:41AM

Posted by Rdio at 9:41AM in New Music Weekly |

New Music Weekly

New Music Weekly - August 26, 2014

Ready for the hottest songs of the week? Our New Music Weekly playlist is always hand-picked for your listening pleasure (don’t forget to subscribe so you can get it automatically each week). On the singles front, there’s a killer new ballad by Jessie Ware co-written by rising star/VMA winner Ed Sheeran, along with crazy infectious tunes by Cobra Starship featuring Icona Pop and Calvin Harris featuring John Newman. The SoCal metal act Avenged Sevenfold revisits their 2003 album for a belated 10th anniversary edition plus look out for the first of several reissues from French electronic act M83.

But that’s just a little sample of what you are going to hear here — there’s much more to check out in the New Music Weekly Playlist and the Rdio New Releases page.

PLAYLIST NOTES

  • Royal Blood - Royal Blood (Explicit)
    The British rock duo set to tour with The Pixies drops a hard-hitting debut album with big sounds and memorable riffs.

  • Ariana Grande - My Everything
    America’s current pop sweetheart (and former Nickelodeon star) collaborates with Iggy Azalea, Big Sean and The Weeknd on her sophomore album.

  • Brad Paisley - Moonshine in the Trunk
    Duets with Emmylou Harris and Carrie Underwood highlight the country vet’s 10th album.

  • Basement Jaxx - Junto (Special Edition)
    The influential UK dance duo digs back underground for sexier sounds on their seventh album, the first since 2009’s Zephyr.

  • Chayanne - En Todo Estaré (Deluxe)
    The 17th studio album from the Puerto Rican star of Latin pop finds him riding a second wave of youthfulness despite over 30 years in the game.

  • The Rentals - Lost in Alphaville
    Matt Sharp and Lauren Chipman return with new bandmates culled from Lucius, Ozma and The Black Keys for their first album in 15 years.

  • The New Pornographers - Brill Bruisers
    The Canadian indie rock vanguards offer the most celebratory songs the group have ever conceived for album number six.

∞  August 26, 2014 — 8:20AM

Posted by Rdio at 8:20AM in New Music Weekly |

News

A Special Gift from Aether for Rdio Subscribers

Side_Black (1)
We are thrilled to announce that today Aether Cone will go on-sale exclusively to new and current Rdio Unlimited subscribers. Cone is the thinking music player that learns what you like and plays what you’ll love. Turn the dial and Cone automatically plays the perfect sound for the moment, selected from more than 25 million tracks on Rdio and filling any room with incredible sound. If you know exactly what you want to hear, tell Cone to “play” an artist, album, or title. As a thank you for being an Rdio subscriber, Cone is gifting a special offer of $5 off your Cone for every month you have subscribed to Rdio, up to $180 off the price. Visit Aether.com to take advantage of this limited time offer.

∞  August 25, 2014 — 11:00AM

Posted by Rdio at 11:00AM in News |

News

Get Connected To Rdio With SoundHound

SoundHound_Rdio_Hero_online
Today, we’re happy to announce a new milestone to Rdio’s integration within SoundHound, the revolutionary sound search mobile app. With the introduction of a new feature called “Connect to Rdio,” after you tag a song in SoundHound, it will be automatically placed in a “SoundHound" playlist accessed from Rdio. Along with this new update, SoundHound users will see a significant increase in the speed of their returned search results.

Here’s how it works — existing SoundHounders will see a plus sign (+) in the results page if they have not connected to Rdio. When the Plus (+) is tapped, SoundHounders will be directed to the set-up page for “Connect To Rdio.” By enabling this feature, users will see all of the songs they identified through SoundHound as a playlist inside Rdio.

“We are always looking for additional ways to enable music discovery for our listeners,” said Chris Becherer, SVP of Product at Rdio. "We’re excited to be working with the SoundHound team to create a dynamic listening experience around songs identified in the real world, right inside Rdio.”

This new update is available now on iOS and Android.

∞  August 20, 2014 — 3:07PM

Posted by Rdio at 3:07PM in News |