New Features

New Feature: Like and Reply to Comments

You asked, we responded. Now you can start a conversation within Rdio by replying directly to any comment left on songs, albums and playlists. Or simply click the Like button on any comment if you just want to show your support. We’ll notify you when someone’s replied to or liked a comment you wrote.

We know you have a lot to say about your favourite tunes, and these new features help keep the conversation going while you’re listening, without ever having to leave Rdio.

Now available on the web and desktop app, coming soon to mobile!

∞  14/11/2014 — 9:50AM

Posted by Rdio at 9:50AM in New Features |

News

Rdio's Family Plan: Same Great Music, An Even Lower Price!

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We’re all about family here at Rdio. That’s why back in 2011 we were the first music service to offer a Family Plan so everyone could simultaneously enjoy Rdio -- anytime, anywhere, online, offline and on any device.

Our Family Plan provides each family member access to more than 30 million songs with individual control over music collection, You FM, stations, playlists and other great features. And now we’re excited to announce that our Family Plan price has been lowered to only £5 GBP for each additional Rdio listener in your family . Here’s the new pricing breakdown:

• Family of 2 = £14.99
• Family of 3 = £19.99
• Family of 4 = £24.99
• Family of 5 = £29.99

With our Family Plan, say goodbye to having only one person being able to listen at a time — or having to share favourites and playlists that aren’t really your own. And say goodbye to friends wondering why “you” are listening to your kid’s music that's overcrowding the Home feed.

Keep your music individuality and sign up for family sub-accounts to your Rdio subscription here. Learn more about the Rdio Family plan here.

We’ll be rolling out the new pricing across the globe starting today, just in time for the holiday season. So you can give your loved ones the gift of the world’s best music experience - tuned to you.

In honor of the occasion, we put together this playlist celebrating the music of family bands.

∞  12/11/2014 — 9:36AM

Posted by Rdio at 9:36AM in News |

Music

#TGIF - Listen to Classic Taylor Swift On Rdio

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Taylor Swift has solidified her spot as America's number one music ingénue, bridging the worlds of country and pop music. Now you can delve into Taylor's library of songs (other than the album "1989"). Check out now-classics like "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together," "I Knew You Were Trouble" and "22" from albums such as "Red," "Speak Now," and "Fearless."

Rdio Unlimited subscribers can hear Taylor’s songs anywhere, anytime they want. For those of you who haven’t yet upgraded, listen to her artist station as part of our ad-supported radio experience.

“Rdio listeners benefit from our longtime commitment to respecting the choices artists and their labels make about how their songs should be distributed. Let’s always remember that artists deserve a say in how their music is shared with their fans,” said Anthony Bay, CEO of Rdio.

It’s #TGIF, so it’s a perfect time to tune into our Taylor Swift station, a mix of pop country songs by Swift and other country artists on Rdio or listen to our curated playlist of our favorite songs that we’re calling “Classic Swift.”

∞  07/11/2014 — 9:35AM

Posted by Rdio at 9:35AM in Music |

Exclusives

Exclusive: Tensnake Mixes First DJ-Powered Rdio Session

Germany’s Marco Niemerski, better known as Tensnake, is the first artist in the world to present a DJ set for his Rdio Session. Recorded live at this year’s SXSW extravaganza, the performance includes songs from his album Glow. He also deftly weaves in extended club versions of career highlights like “Love Unlimited,” recorded with singer Fiora and legendary producer Nile Rodgers, with tracks from colleagues he admires. Check out more recordings from this up close and personal series over at the Rdio Sessions Station.

∞  28/10/2014 — 12:48PM

Posted by Rdio at 12:48PM in Exclusives |

Exclusives

Exclusive: SOHN Shakes Up Rdio Sessions

You can hear the world-wise poise in the music of English electronic artist SOHN (aka Christopher Taylor). Since 2010, he has called Vienna his home, where his work as a producer for himself as well as for rising stars like Banks along with remixes for the likes of Lana Del Rey and Disclosure have earned him shout outs from unique artists like Lorde and Miguel.

SOHN’s exclusive Rdio Sessions was performed at Decibelle Recording Studio in San Francisco and features highlights from his deliciously dark and soulful debut album Tremors, including the singles “Bloodflows” and “Lessons.” Tune in to the Rdio Sessions Station to hear more live sets from this eclectic series, including recent performances by Daughtry, Jon Pardi, Lucius, and many more.

∞  21/10/2014 — 10:10AM

Posted by Rdio at 10:10AM in Exclusives |

New FeaturesNews

Rdio Now With iOS 8 and CarPlay Support

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Today we’re announcing an exciting update for iOS 8 that continues our commitment to creating the best music service in the world, tuned to you.

Our latest update includes:
- CarPlay Support. We’re one of the first music services to be integrated into Apple’s CarPlay. Control Rdio playback and navigate your favorites and playlists from the built-in display in CarPlay-enabled cars.
- Interactive Notifications. Play music and follow people directly from an Rdio push notification.
-Optimized Visuals. Enjoy high-resolution images and album artwork with your iPhone 6 and iPhone 6+.

Download Rdio for iOS and try out the new features for yourself. Be sure to follow @Rdio on Twitter and Like Rdio on Facebook to stay up-to-date with our apps.

∞  16/10/2014 — 12:16PM

Posted by Rdio at 12:16PM in New Features, News |

New FeaturesNews

Introducing High-Quality AAC Audio Across The Globe

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Today we’re happy to announce we’ve converted our entire catalog of over 30 million songs to high-quality AAC audio. Listeners around the world now have four sound quality settings to choose from across iOS, Android, and the web. All Rdio users can choose between data-efficient 64 kbps all the way up to 192 kbps. Rdio Unlimited subscribers now also have the option of listening in pristine-quality 320 kbps. Plus individually select your audio settings for a variety of uses, whether you’re using Wi-Fi or cellular streaming or listening to offline downloads.

Our commitment to sound quality also deepens today with our partnership with Bob Weir, the legendary founding member of the Grateful Dead and champion of Musicians for Audio Quality Initiative. To celebrate this milestone, we’re releasing an exclusive catalog of Bob Weir tracks recorded at the Tamalpais Research Institute (TRI Studios), his state of the art studio in Marin County, CA. The catalog features Weir as well as musicians like Dave Schools, Sammy Hagar, and many others.

Download the latest updates to Rdio on iOS and Android to start this exciting new listening experience today.

∞  16/10/2014 — 11:17AM

Posted by Rdio at 11:17AM in New Features, News |

Exclusives

Exclusive: Daughtry's Rockin' Rdio Session

Daughtry has been rocking for seven years strong now. Fronted by American Idol alum Chris Daughtry, the band has become one of the most successful acts to be even tangentially associated with the reality show, blowing past the small domestic screen to achieve international success. Their live performance for our exclusive Rdio Sessions showcases songs from last year’s risk-taking album Baptized (including the title track, “Long Live Rock & Roll” and “Waiting for Superman”) alongside “Home,” a single from the multi-platinum selling self-titled debut album that topped Billboard’s Adult Top 40 and Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks charts in 2007.

Head over to the Rdio Sessions Station for frequently updated highlights of this multi-genre live series that’s recorded all over the world in front of Rdio listeners just like you.

∞  14/10/2014 — 12:35PM

Posted by Rdio at 12:35PM in Exclusives |

Exclusives

Exclusive: Strange Talk's Effortlessly Cool Rdio Session

Melbourne’s Strange Talk has gotten rave reviews for their concerts, where their energy and charisma has won them a growing legion of fans. We’re excited to now have an opportunity to share their special onstage synth pop magic with listeners all around the world.

The quartet (Stephen Docker, Gerard Sidhu, Travis Constable and Gillian Gregory) brings their sunny beats and memorable melodies to the latest Rdio Sessions performance. The five-song set draws from the band’s killer debut album Cast Away, including the propulsive debut single “Climbing Walls” and the most recent sizzler “Young Hearts.”

Tune in to the Rdio Sessions Station to hear more from this international live series that’s exclusively for you!

∞  23/09/2014 — 12:26PM

Posted by Rdio at 12:26PM in Exclusives |

News

The Renaissance of Music Collecting

By Marc Ruxin

I was six when I first fell for music. I raided my parent’s record collection, skipped the classical records, didn’t quite understand jazz or blues, but fell hard for The Beatles. Although it was the music that made me smile, it was also the act of pulling the record from the sleeve, admiring the art, reading the song titles, cleaning the vinyl, and dropping the needle on the record that was very much part of the fun.

As it turned out, this was not a passing phase. I’d listen to the radio to fall asleep. It was the mid-70’s so the commercial music on the radio was what we now describe as classic rock, with a heavy dose of disco. By the time I was 12, I would begin to spend my hard earned allowance on records. Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Tom Petty, Styx, Foreigner, Wings, Billy Squire, The Police, The Who, Ozzy Osborne - it was pretty obvious stuff I suppose, even though some of it didn’t endure the test of time. In the 7th grade, a buddy with cool older brothers, played me a cassette called “This Are Two Tone.” My mind was blown initially by the stark black and white mod cover art, but then I listened to the music. It was on that tape that I discovered The Specials, The Selector, Madness and finally The English Beat. My life was changed by rock and roll. The next day I raided my piggy bank and bought all the records I could find by the artists on the compilation.

I was hooked. I begged my parents to get me a subscription to Rolling Stone, and then Spin, and a few years later Option Magazine. I clipped out album reviews, band photos, and hung them on the cork wall in my bedroom next to the posters that came from the various albums: Devo, Wings, Rush. The first thing I did when I turned 16 and got my drivers license was drive to Cleveland to buy records. For the next 20 years I frittered away most of my allowance or paychecks, and much of my free time, milling through bins of records and CDs building a massive collection of life-changing music.

But at some point in the early 2000’s I started buying digital albums, primarily from eMusic and then eventually from Amazon or directly from artist sites. I never liked the DRM on iTunes, and so I steered clear of Apple as a music store. I stopped going to Amoeba Music music every weekend, Kim’s Video in NYC closed, and slowly but surely a huge part of my lifelong obsession collecting physical music ended. Option Magazine was long gone, Rolling Stone had become a magazine about politics and celebrity photos, and Spin had long lost its focus. I now bought external hard-drives and spent an ungodly amount of time digitizing CDs, scrubbing the messy metadata and multiple copies of albums digitized at various bit rates. Then Napster happened, and the music business was turned on its head. It became easier to steal music than to buy it. I never bought into file sharing, because after all if artists couldn’t make a living making music, there wouldn’t be as many artists trying to make music. I was trying to do my part in a very small way, so I continued as a small patron buying tracks and albums.

There were no more beautiful double albums, liner notes, and song lyrics. There was no more flipping of albums, browsing through walls of CDs in search of the perfect album. It was more about accumulating digital bits on increasingly small and slick drives. But then came the iPod. The Walkman and headphone culture had been largely dead for eons, but these digital files could now be consumed on these small sleek devices. Tiny white headphones became a fashion accessory, and collecting music started to get interesting again.

But then something amazing happened. Online music services started to emerge. There was Pandora, Rhapsody, Mog, iMeem and eventually Spotify, Soundcloud and Rdio. Initially they were web services because mobile devices weren’t sophisticated enough to handle the software, and there wasn’t enough storage to take advantage of the promise of “renting” infinite amounts of music. Broadband signals were weak so streaming was often challenging. But then came the iPhone and the app store, and the companies that survived built apps, and the labels started to allow for the legal streaming of music to phones and computers. Companies like Sonos made it easy to stream files from central archives, and eventually blue tooth devices like the Jambox made it easy to push music over Bluetooth to compact devices.

The magazines of old were replaced by wonderful blogs like Pitchfork, Brooklyn Vegan, Aquarium Drunkard, and Hipster Runoff. Artists could now release singles, covers and EPs immediately, and ride the hype cycle into instant stardom. Distribution was becoming increasingly influenced by artists, and these new platforms made being a music collector so much more immediate, accessible and inexpensive.

In the old days, you needed to be rich, or content being poor to be a great collector. Albums, CDs and cassettes were expensive relative to today’s $10 a month subscription service. For less than the cost of one downloaded album on iTunes or Amazon, you can have over 30M tracks available online or offline, on the web or your phone, played through a stereo, or computer or tablet. Instead of having to commit to buying something on a whim that might suck, you can easily test drive a song or an album at no additional cost. Had this option been available to me as a teenager, I would have saved literally thousands of dollars a year. Instead of buying magazine subscriptions, I can read reviews, watch live concerts and videos for free.

Discovery is also considerably easier. You now have social features that prompt you when there are new releases and highlights popular music across your social graph accessible in a single click. After all people turn people onto music and that will never change. Things like bios, photos, and social media are integrated into these services, reducing the endless trolling for the right reviews, or buried diamonds in the new release rough. Now you can have most of the music ever recorded complete with all the context (reviews, ratings, etc.) delivered over the Internet to whatever device you happen to be on.

The act of collecting has become more about consuming and connecting. The times they are a changin’.

At Rdio we have built what I would argue is the most comprehensive service available to give music lovers music any way they want it. Songs, albums, playlists and starting today radio stations built around you. From algorithmically generated stations that can be initiated with a song or artist, to fully curated stations based on mood or genre, to personal stations where people can listen to other people’s recent activity. You can now access all of this for free supported by ads or uninterrupted for a fraction of the cost of a single CD.

The future is now. Artists can reach a global audience instead of the one restricted by physical distribution and retail marketing. This is a good thing. The more listeners an artist can attract directly, the more money they can make. The more money they can make, the more artists will continue to pursue creating art.

In the end surely something was lost when the act of physical collecting disappeared. The era of “High Fidelity” is largely over. The Jack Blacks who man the counters of dusty record stores are gone. The smell of new vinyl is restricted to purists, and the hand printed zines of old are all but extinct. The walls of records and CD’s have disappeared from apartments and houses, but now these private collections can be shared with the world in pint-sized digital images.

Collecting music is now a democratic, global endeavor. You don’t have to live in hip cities to access limited edition music. You don’t have to be rich to afford the pursuit. Nearly everything is available to anyone with a smartphone or computer. Music is, after all, one of the world’s most creative inventions. It is highly local, yet massively global. After years of trying to build a model where both consumers and artists win, we are finally at the beginning of something amazing. Technology has caught up, and the business of music has finally entered a safe and exciting time.

I couldn’t be more proud to be part of a company that built a business specifically to bring music to everybody, wherever they are and no matter what music they like. In the immortal words of Bob Marley “where there is a will, there is always a way.” It has been a long journey, but today the song doesn’t remain the same, but then again it does … only differently.

Marc Ruxin is the COO of Rdio.

∞  04/09/2014 — 8:15PM

Posted by Rdio at 8:15PM in News |